I HAVE A DREAM

by Anastasia Fenkner

I have a dream that one day all people in this nation will enjoy life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

I have a dream that one day in the woods of Connecticut the victims of gun violence and the supporters of gun rights can walk arm and arm.

I have a dream that one day even in the NRA’s head office, the rights of gun victims will be defended with the same intensity now reserved for gun owners.

I have a dream that my two sisters and I will one day live in a nation where safety and security does not come from the barrel of a gun but in the love for one another.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the state of our reality, where violence is glorified and might makes right, will be transformed into a place where arms are used for hugging, not hurting.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the 30 thousand Americans who die of gun violence each year will not die in vain. I have a dream that one day they do not die at all. They study, they work, they giggle, they laugh, and they live.

I have a dream today.

There will be a day when children go to school without fear. When walking down the street, visiting a shopping mall, or going to the post office does not end in a random, senseless, mind-numbing tragedy. I have a dream that one day we will wake up and the nightmare of gun violence will be over.

 

This will be the day when all Americans will stand up and pledge allegiance to a non-violent country. “I pledge allegiance to the United States of America…One Nation, Indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.

“I wrote this essay as a school assignment. We had to write about something we think is unfair in the world, using Martin Luther King’s style. I am soon to be 12 years old. I go to 6th grade at Washington Elementary School. I have 2 sisters, Natalie and Sophia. I like to bake, read and sculpt.” 

 

Anastasia Fenkner, daughter of Tatiana Fenker, CAGV Steering Committee member. 

DOES A GUN IN THE HOME MAKE A WOMAN SAFER?

Statistics and studies suggest owning a firearm could make a household more vulnerable NOT safer. 

The fact is, not a single study to date has shown that the risk of any crime including burglary, robbery, home invasion, or spousal abuse against a female is decreased through gun ownership. Though there are examples of women using a gun to defend themselves, they are few and far between, and not statistically significant.

Continue reading “DOES A GUN IN THE HOME MAKE A WOMAN SAFER?”

“CIVIL IMMUNITY”

GUN MANUFACTURERS ARE NEVER LIABLE

The Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act bans lawsuits against gun dealers and manufacturers “for the harm caused by those who criminally or unlawfully misuse firearm products.” The law was passed under intense pressure from the National Rifle Association (NRA) amid a number of lawsuits by city governments that accused the gun industry of creating a “public nuisance” by encouraging the proliferation of weapons. The NRA thanked President Bush for signing the Act, for which it had lobbied, describing it as, “the most significant piece of pro-gun legislation in twenty years into law.” In the years before passage of the act, victims of firearms violence in the United States had successfully sued manufacturers and dealers for negligence on the grounds that they should have foreseen that their products would be diverted to criminal use. The purpose of the act is to prevent firearms manufacturers and dealers from being held liable for negligence when crimes have been committed with their products. Passage of the act curtailed lawsuits pending from dozens of individuals, 30 cities and the state of New York.

Continue reading ““CIVIL IMMUNITY””

Stand Your Ground Laws + Guns = Deadly Mix … or “GO AHEAD MAKE MY DAY”

Are‘Stand Your Ground Laws’ and guns too deadly a mixture, questions Scott Martelle’s Op-Ed, 2/19/2014 L.A. Times, excerpted in part below.

“These are not abstract issues, particularly with the current legal and legislative debates over regulating concealed weapons. Is an armed America a more aggressive America? And does the existence of stand-your-ground laws make confrontations more likely to turn violent?” Continue reading “Stand Your Ground Laws + Guns = Deadly Mix … or “GO AHEAD MAKE MY DAY””

Remember and Recommit

When you look at the faces of the 20 children and 6 educators of Sandy Hook Elementary School whose lives were so violently taken December 14, 2012, your heart stops, your heart breaks. Sadly each day in America 8 children’s lives are violently ended with a firearm, equivalent to a Sandy Hook every three days. Saturday, December 14th it will mark one year since the families of these young souls were gunned down, their lives lost forever. That is how long a parent and loved ones grieve over the loss of a child—forever.

Think then of the 6 Sandy Hook Elementary School teachers who instantly knew what they and their children were facing—they had to protect, to give their lives without a doubt. As a teacher you always look at your class as ‘your children’ because they are.

About 275 people are shot every day – about 85 die and about 195 survive. 30,000 Americans have died since the slaughter of these 20 innocent children and six adults in Newtown, Connecticut. Why do we minimize the carnage with our messaging? The physical, emotional, and economic toll to those who survive a gunshot is staggering.  In the US, a person is hit with a bullet every 5 minutes!!

Josh Stepakoff was six when he was shot twice in the leg in 1999 at the North Valley Community Center in Los Angeles by Buford Furrow five people were wounded including three children. He is among many people who have witnessed the horrific sights and sounds of a mass shooting as a very young child. Like the children of Newtown, Connecticut, he saw blood, he heard screams and he was scared for his life. Afterwards he said he couldn’t be a normal child. As a teenager, Stepakoff decided to do work with the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, and found solace in talking to other victims. Many survivors and family members become involved in gun violence prevention groups to hopefully prevent others from going through what they experience daily.

There will be more talk about the “troubled” shooter now that the Connecticut police report has been released. There are millions of troubled children and adults. Certainly America needs to allocate more money for mental health and take actual concrete steps in communities to help people suffering with emotional problems. Every time there is shooting, we read that the killer was disturbed, mentally ill or had a troubled childhood. However, only 5% of the mentally ill are considered dangerous. We all suffer emotional responses to the crises in our lives. But when a gun is handy, then the anger, the depression takes an ugly violent turn. And what we know is that there are too many guns and more guns mean more murders and more gun suicides. Realize that many of these mass shooters were angry depressed males who wanted to commit mayhem and then suicide.

 Why?  There are too many whys.  The country was and continues to be shocked and yet the carnage goes on day after day.  The battles against gun violence prevention laws go on in Congress and state legislatures have gotten as virulent as the battles on the streets and in the homes of this nation as Americans continue to die needlessly from gun violence.
 
Put your concerns into action because the shooting war goes on in our nation daily.  What motivates those of us who work avidly for gun violence prevention? 
 
An interfaith Memoriam will be held at the Trinity Episcopal Church at 1500 State Street on Saturday, December 14 from 12:00 to 1:00.  Remember and recommit.  Join us.

Toni Wellen
Chair, Coalition Against Gun Violence
(805) 684-8434